sales@mediastorehouse.co.uk
Framed Pictures, Canvas Prints
Posters & Jigsaws since 2004
 

Featured

Choose a picture from our Featured collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. Popular choices include Framed Prints, Canvas Prints, Posters and Jigsaw Puzzles. All professionally made for quick delivery.


Featured Print

Tel el Saba

Tel el Saba was a Turkish held artillery position on Oct 31st 1918 when British and Anzac units attacked Beersheba
The hillock on right horizon in the shot is Tel el Saba which was a Turkish artillery position taken on 31st Oct 1918 by the Anzac Light Horse with support from an HAC battery. This shot is taken from a ridge about 400m to the east which still has, to my eye at least, evidence of gunpits. The low ground to left of centre is the plain across which the Australian Light Horse made their famous charge to capture the town itself.
The site was a fortified city in 9th C. BC and was almost certainly referred to in the Bible in 2 Kings 18:13-19:37 when Sennacherib, King of Assyria captured King Hezekiah and destroyed 46 of his walled cities in 701 BC. Later it was the site of a fort built by Herod and a later Roman settlement and is best known to us as Beersheba.
This is described on the The Taylor Prism which is a six-sided baked clay document (or prism) discovered at the Assyrian capital Nineveh, in an area known today as Nebi Yunus. It was acquired by Colonel R. Taylor, British Consul General at Baghdad, in 1830, after whom it is named. The British Museum purchased it from Taylor's widow in 1855. As one of the first major Assyrian documents found, this document played an important part in the decipherment of the cuneiform script.
It describes the campaigns of King Sennacherib (704-681 BC0 thus
As for Hezekiah the Judahite, who did not submit to my yoke: forty-six of his strong, walled cities, as well as the small towns in their area, which were without number, by levelling with battering-rams and by bringing up seige-engines, and by attacking and storming on foot, by mines, tunnels, and breeches, I besieged and took them. 200,150 people, great and small, male and female, horses, mules, asses, camels, cattle and sheep without number, I brought away from them and counted as spoil. (Hezekiah) himself, like a caged bird I shut up in Jerusalem, his royal city. I threw up earthworks against hima

© Mike St. Maur Sheil / westernfrontphotography.com

Featured Print

High Wood

High Wood from the track leading from Crucifix Corner at Bazentin le Petit. This is the track along which the two officwers walked on the morning of July 14th.
Shown on maps as Bois de Foureaux it was to be last of the major Somme woods to be captured.
14 July a dawn attack on Longueval - Battle of Bazentin Ridge was successful and early in the day two officers walked to High Wood and found it unoccupied. Due to series of communication failures no attack was really launched until late in the afternoon when 2/Queens and 1/South Staffs reached the wood. Squadrons of Deccan Horse and 7/DRagoons also entered the Wood but found the Germans in increasing strength on the northern edge of the wood.
15 July Germans launched a counter-attack in the dark and regained most of the wood
20/21 July 1/Cameronians, 5/Scottish Rifles, 20/Royal Fus. attacked from south east and after gaining a foot hold in the wood were forced back. 2/RWelch Fusiliers attacked [ Robert Graves severely wounded near Bazentin churchyard ] but unable to hold the ground with every officer wounded.
22/23 4/Gordon Highlanders, 1/R.West Kents attacked but Germans had built additional defensive line - Intermediate Line.
30 Attack preceded by heavy barrage and troops using creeping barrage but German M-g drove attack back and 14/R.Warwicks lost 171 out of 468 attackers.
Aug
Tunnelling operation begun to lay mine under M-g position on eastern side of wood.
18 Major bombardment but attack gained little ground.
Sept
3 178/Tunnelling Coy. blew 3000lb mine under M-g and 1/Black Watch took position but 1/Cameronians and 8/Berks to the east were unable to advance and Germans rtegained the mine crater.
8/9 Another mine blown but Germans regained the crater as attacking troops caught in own barrage which fell short.
15/16 Plan was drawn up to use tanks but the terrible state of the ground with broken tree stumps negated their impact. Major Gen Barter, commanding 47th Div wanted to wthdraw his troops and bombard the wood but was refused.
The infantry attack on the wood was made by the London Irish (18th Londons), Poplar & Stepney Rifles (17th Londons) and two companys of the 15th Londons (Civil Service Rifles). They suffered from enemy machine-gun fire as, just before zero, they lay in No Mans Land ahead of their trenches. By mid-morning there were five battalions desperately fighting for possesion of High Wood, and they called for an artillery barrage on the west and north-west part of the wood, and trench mortars to bombard the eastern portion.
Finally at 1300 the British took the wood. Barter was subsequently relieved of command because of the losses which the 47/Div had suffered. The London Cemetery was started after this action.

© Mike St. Maur Sheil / westernfrontphotography.com